patinagle16: (headshot)
This "Blog Hop" is a question and answer game that some of my writer pals are playing.  Here's some information about my current Work In Progress, followed by links to other writers posting about theirs.  Enjoy!

Q: What is the working title of your book?  
A: CURSE OF THE FALLEN or CURSE OF THE ALBEN, not sure which.  What do you think?  Is CURSE OF THE ALBEN confusing?

Q: Where did the idea come from for the book?
A: Short answer: This is book 4 of my Blood of the Kindred series, inspired by my short story, "Kind Hunter" (which you can read at Book View Café - it's the free sample from the anthology DRAGON LORDS AND WARRIOR WOMEN).

Q: What genre does your book fall under?
A: Fantasy

Q: Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?
A: Well, Orlando Bloom is the quintessential elf in my eyes, so I'd cast him as Turisan.  For Eliani - yanno, Zooey Deschanel might work!  For Shalár, I think Kaley Cuoco would do a very good job.  And for Luruthin, perhaps Matthew Gray Gubler.

Q: What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?
A: As war with the alben intensifies in Fireshore, Eliani and Turisan return to Highstone, where the Ælven Council must decide the future of the Lost: will they be exiled like the alben, or will they become allies whose aid might tip the balance in the war?

Q: Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?
A: Well, kind of neither.  Since the series was dropped after book 2 by the original publisher, I have elected to continue publishing it with the help of the wonderful publishing cooperative Book View Café.  Book 3, Swords Over Fireshore, came out in 2012.  Oh, and this book should be out in spring of 2013.

Q: How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?
A: About a year.

Q: What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?
A: It's my take on a Lord of the Rings type of fantasy.

Q: Who or What inspired you to write this book?
A: Tolkein, of course.  I've been a fan of LotR since I was around 12, I guess, when I first read it.  I especially love elves, so my own stories are about the Ælven.  Also, see question 2.

Q: What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?
A: The Blood of the Kindred series is my exploration of the question posed in "Kind Hunter," namely:  what if elves and vampires were originally the same race?

Book 1: The Betrayal
Book 2: Heart of the Exiled
Book 3: Swords Over Fireshore

And now, here are some other writers who are playing this game:


Patricia Burroughs http://planetpooks.com/the-blog/

Jeffrey A. Carver http://starrigger.blogspot.com

Katharine Eliska "Cat" Kimbriel http://alfreda89.livejournal.com/661783.html

Steven Harper Piziks http://spiziks.livejournal.com

Deborah J. Ross http://www.deborahjross.blogspot.com/

Laura Underwood http://laurajunderwood.livejournal.com/

Edited to add: 

Kelly A. Harmon http://kellyaharmon.com/work-progress-update-meme/

Cindie Geddes http://cindiegeddes.com/2012/11/29/the-next-big-thing/

Have fun!

patinagle16: (headshot)
Coyote UglyFall was kind of hectic, and I forgot to announce this.  I know many of my readers have been wanting a print edition of my short story collection, Coyote Ugly.  Well, it's now available!  You can order it here, or request it from your favorite bookstore.
patinagle16: (candle)

It was surreal to watch Sandy make landfall near Atlantic City even as my new novel, much of which takes place in that town, was released.

Whenever a natural disaster occurs, I get a sick feeling of helplessness. I’ve learned to counter that by doing something, even something small, to offset the overwhelming feelings.

So I’ve picked out a charity near Atlantic City, the Food Bank of South Jersey, and for every sale of Dead Man’s Hand at BVC during November, I’ll donate $2 to them.

I’m starting off with a $50 donation now, because I know they need the funds now. If the book sells more than 25 copies at BVC this month, I’ll send more.

So tell your friends. If you’d like to read a nice poker zombie story, and want to do a little something to help the folks who got hit hard by Sandy, this is a way to do both.

DEAD MAN'S HAND by Pati Nagle Dead Man’s Hand by Pati Nagle

Wild Bill Hickok awakens to the feel of flesh crawling onto his bones. Alive again, in the graveyard in Deadwood on a cold October night, he has an irresistible compulsion to go to Atlantic City.

There, in the mysterious and magical Black Queen casino, he joins a rogue’s gallery of resurrected scoundrels, all gamblers who were murdered like himself. Will the father of organized crime revert to his bad habits and attempt to take over the Queen? Will Wild Bill finally find out if those aces and eights are winners? Five murdered men sit down to a poker tournament for the highest possible stakes: the right to stay alive.

patinagle16: (Default)
Congrats to eiricmacbean who won the prize here for the BVC Grand Opening! 

His choice:

What Ho, Automaton!What Ho, Automaton!

“A fun blend of P.G. Wodehouse, steampunk and a touch of Sherlock Holmes. Dolley is a master at capturing and blending all these elements. More than fascinating, this work is also rip-roaring fun!”
SF Revu



Great book, I really enjoyed it.  Hope you do too!
patinagle16: (Default)
It's been a long time coming, and a lot of work.  I'm absolutely delighted to announce that Book View Café, the author-owned publishing cooperative of which I'm a member, is at last celebrating the opening of our new, completely-redesigned bookstore!

Party Favors!  We're giving our readers chances to win the book of their choice from BVC's catalog!  Just take a look around the store anytime up until midnight, June 8, and choose the book you’d like—all the books that are eligible for the giveaway are marked with a gold star. Then come back here and leave a comment with the name and author of the book and why you want it (we may use that comment for publicity purposes). When the promotion ends, I'll announce a winner here and that winner will get a coupon for the book s/he chose.

Books on Sale:  for the Grand Opening, I've got two titles on sale at $2 off the list price, Immortal and Glorieta Pass.  Use coupon codes IM-GO and GP-GO to get the discounts.  Most BVC anthologies are also on sale, half price, for the celebration.

Full details (and another chance to win a book) are available at the BVC Grand Opening Celebration page. Check it out!

patinagle16: (Default)
HEART OF THE EXILED is out today.  Hurrah!

I blogged about fantasy art at Ninc.com.  Comment about your favorite fantasy artist (on the Ninc blog, not here) for a chance to win a free copy of the book.

Whew!
patinagle16: (Default)
I am in the waiting room at the car dealership, biding my time while my car receives an expensive 60,000 mile service.  They provide free pastries and fruit and coffee and tea, and more importantly, free Wi-Fi.  So I am catching up on email and reading blogs and having a fairly pleasant time considering.

Looked at my backlist ebook sales numbers at Amazon this morning.  Two books sold so far this month!  That raised my spirits, actually, because after the first week of November I had no sales and was starting to get depressed.  It's a fair amount of work to prepare a book for ebook publication, so it's nice to see some sales coming in.

coverI'm finalizing a new ebook to release on 12/21, and I'm pretty excited about it. Coyote Ugly is a collection of my short fiction, some previously published, some entirely new, plus some extra treats (hint:  I've been perfecting my recipe for New Mexican Hot Cocoa).

This book is a labor of love.  For a long time I've wanted to make my short story, "Coyote Ugly," available again.  It first appeared in The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy, and it was my first official professional short fiction sale. 

Some of the stories in this book are favorites of mine that never found the right market.  A couple of them are set in New Mexico, and are probably hard for New York publishers to "get."  So this book is strong on New Mexico, though there's lots of other stuff in there too.

I did the cover art, and that was also a labor of love.  New Mexicans like it because it depicts Zozobra, a Santa Fe tradition since the early 20th century.  Zozobra is our own funky local version of the Burning Man, I guess you could say.  Also known as "Old Man Gloom," he is burned every September at the start of the Santa Fe Fiesta, and the tradition is that by burning Zozobra, we are burning our troubles.

I'm curious - what do you non-New Mexicans think of the cover art?  Is it intriguing at all?  Confusing?  Just weird?
patinagle16: (Default)
Here it is! Heart of the Exiled

I really love this cover. 
patinagle16: (Default)
I've been even more quiet than usual lately, because I was working on finishing this project, of which I'm extremely proud:

BREWING FINE FICTION, Advice for Writers From the Authors at Book View Café (ISBN 978-0-9828440-3-8). BVC’s members include international bestselling authors and winners of the National Book Award, the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and many others. Most have sold multiple novels to major publishers. Many have taught writing at workshops around the world. The knowledge of these professional authors is gathered into one volume, edited by Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff and Pati Nagle, that will help both new and experienced writers cope with the creative challenges and the nuts-and-bolts business issues of a career in writing fiction.

“Check any bookstore and you'll find a host of titles on writing. Some are good, some not so good. Every author has his or her own strengths and weaknesses. But in BREWING FINE FICTION: Advice for writers from the authors of Bookview Café, you get a smorgasbord of professional advice and expertise. From the plausibility of fantasy, by Ursula K. Le Guin, to Deborah J. Ross's comments on reviews, you'll find every facet of the craft and writing life covered. For the wealth of information, experience, and diversity, all under one cover, you can't beat it.”
--Mary Rosenblum, Compton Crook Award winner

Contributors to Brewing Fine Fiction include: Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff, Amy Sterling Casil, Brenda W. Clough, Lori Devoti, Chris Dolley, Laura Anne Gilman, Sue Lange, Ursula K. Le Guin, Vonda N. McIntyre, Nancy Jane Moore, Pati Nagle, Steven Harper Piziks, Irene Radford, Patricia Rice, Madeleine E. Robins, Deborah J. Ross, Sherwood Smith, Jennifer Stevenson, Judith Tarr, Gerald M. Weinberg, and Sarah Zettel.

In celebration of the launch, BVC is giving out free copies of WAYS TO TRASH YOUR WRITING CAREER.  This ebook is a collection of humorous stories posted to the Book View Cafe blog by the BVC authors describing the fastest ways to bring your writing career to a screeching halt. The compilation is available free of charge to anyone purchasing a copy of BREWING FINE FICTION through the BVC website. It is also for sale as a stand alone for $.99 (http://www.bookviewcafe.com/index.php/Ways-to-Trash-Your-Writing-Career).

BREWING FINE FICTION is available at the Book View Café website (along with WAYS TO TRASH YOUR WRITING CAREER) for $4.99 in pdf,  epub, mobi, prc, lit, and lrf formats (http://www.bookviewcafe.com/index.php/Brewing-Fine-Fiction). BREWING FINE FICTION will be available at Kindle, Smashwords, Kobo, and B&N soon.

Sample BREWING FINE FICTION: http://www.bookviewcafe.com/index.php/Sample-Brewing-Fine-Fiction

Squee!

Jul. 15th, 2010 01:04 pm
patinagle16: (Default)
I got a peek at the cover for my next book, Heart of the Exiled (January 2011).  Unfortunately I can't share it yet, so you'll just have to take my word that it's gorgeous.
patinagle16: (Default)
Book View Café authors will chat about their new fantasy ebook anthology, Dragon Lords and Warrior Women, tomorrow evening from 8-11 pm EDT.

My story "Kind Hunter" is in this anthology, along with works from Ursula K. Le Guin, Vonda N. McIntyre, Sherwood Smith, and more.

Come on by and chat with the authors! We will have a drawing for a free copy of Dragon Lords and Warrior Women.

When: Tuesday, March 16, 8-11 pm EDT

Where: http://tinychat.com/bookviewcafe
patinagle16: (Default)
Something all writers should pay attention to: Dean Wesley Smith has been hosting a very lively and illuminating discussion of agents on his blog recently.  Other pro writers have pitched in with their views and experience.  This is a must-read for any writer who is dealing or contemplating dealing with an agent.  It's like a two-day intensive course on agents in publishing.

First post (read the 90-odd comments):

http://www.deanwesleysmith.com/?p=720

Second post (read the comments here too):

http://www.deanwesleysmith.com/?p=740


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


And an unrelated tidbit for ebook fans:  all four of Sarah Zettel’s popular Paths to Camelot series are on sale for $1.99 from now until Sunday Jan. 24.

Paths to Camelot on Book View Cafe:
http://www.bookviewcafe.com/index.php/Sarah-Zettel/

Paths to Camelot on Smashwords.com
http://www.smashwords.com/books/search?query=Book+View+Cafe
patinagle16: (aurora)


George R. R. Martin has donated several signed collector's items to raise money for Match It For Pratchett, including a wonderful limited edition, leather bound copy of FEVRE DREAM. They are being auctioned now on ebay.

Happy Spring, everyone!

2 pages written today

Points in The Race:
26 for short stories
11 for novels
----------------------
37 total
patinagle16: (Default)


Yes, I did it again. Broke the lid of the most recent teapot. Here is its replacement, a nice pansy chintz with a spire on top.

A spire. Aspire? Well, it being the new year, aspirations are appropriate. I'm not big on New Year's resolutions, but since I managed pretty well to hold to last year's, I'll venture another.
In 2008, I'm going to keep a record of all the books I read.

I've been thinking about doing this for a while. Partly because now and then someone sends me a poll asking how many books I read in a year, and I have to shrug my shoulders. I have no clue. Seems like I read an awful lot, but much of my reading is online these days - news and lists and whatnot. So it's time for a reality check.

I'm also curious how much fiction I read as compared to non-fiction. I used to read tons of fiction, but I think these days research makes up a greater proportion of my reading.

So, book list coming to the website soon. As soon as I finish reading a book. (Mine don't count.)

2 pages written today.

Points in The Race:
24 for short stories
8 for novels
----------------------
32 total
patinagle16: (headshot)

dayMy dear husband gave me fountains for our anniversary. Specifically, the fountains at the Bellagio in Las Vegas. We stayed in a room with a magnificent view of the fountains, which showed us rainbows by day and glorious splendor by night. We also dined at the Eiffel Tower Restaurant, and watched the fountains from that side (excellent restaurant, by the way - one of the best meals we've ever had). One of my favorite shows begins with a circle of mist and random flashes of light reminiscent of a lightning storm. We saw that from the Eiffel Tower. Never did figure out which music went to it, as the music can't be heard in the restaurant.

I'm fascinated by this city, which has a lot of motivations and qualities that I definitely dislike. What I do like about it is that it is a center of creativity. Many artists make their living here, not to mention designers, world class chefs, and so on.

In a city centered around money, the fountains at Bellagio are free for all to enjoy. I think that's wonderful, and also brilliant. The overall beauty of Bellagio raises it above the average in Las Vegas. In my opinion, Bellagio raised the bar and is still the standard of excellence in this ever-changing town.

nightI'm very fond of Cirque du Soleil and we saw my two favorite shows on this visit - Mystere, and O. Both wonderful. Mystere especially is magical. It's interesting to observe the progression from Mystere, which still has a "circus" atmosphere, to O, which is more sophisticated and complicated, to Ká, in which the technology almost outshines the performers.

Creativity has been on my mind lately because I'm reading The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida. Lots of resonance here. Florida posits that creativity is now the driving force in our culture and economy. As a person who works in the arts, I naturally find this appealing.

Points in The Race:

22 for stories
32 for novels (Dean said I should take the points back until the books go into production)

54 total

2 pages written
patinagle16: (Default)


Sue Monk Kidd is a writer of literary fiction, according to Miss Snark, the literary agent. All I can say is, I'm glad I didn't know that before I picked up the book. I've read some so-called literary fiction that bored me silly, and some that annoyed me to no end, and for the most part the term makes me run screaming.

So why did I read THE MERMAID CHAIR?

1. Intriguing title, enough to make me read a little of the cover copy. (I hate spoilers, so I often don't read cover copy.)

2. Cover copy - I read just enough to know that it's about a monastery with a chair carved in the shape of mermaids, and that a woman falls in love with a monk.

It's a wonderiful book about people's lives being shattered and remade in emotional kaleidoscopes. Beautifully written, but not in that self-conscious, literary fiction "aren't my words gorgeous" sort of way. It's a lovely read with no slow spots, about characters so engaging that you forgive them for doing the unthinkable.

I find it interesting that THE MERMAID CHAIR hooked me, when THE SECRET LIFE OF BEES didn't. I mean the titles alone. MERMAID CHAIR was intriguing enough to make me look for more, but BEES was just "that sounds interesting maybe I should look at it some time." Since I read GARLIC AND SAPPHIRES because of the title as well, I think I'm going to start paying more attention to titles and my reactions to same.

Six pages today. Happy Equinox!
patinagle16: (Default)


A fellow writer recently issued a challenge to share what we're reading, so here goes. I was attracted to the cover of this book (take note, marketing professionals!) because the woman on it, whose face is obscured by a plate of pasta, reminded me of a friend of mine.

Not much help is it? But wait - I was also intrigued by the title. In fact the title was what got me to look at the cover. And the subtitle - "The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise" - was what got me to track down the book.

I love dress-up, and I love food (Reichl was restaurant critic for The New York Times) so I figured it would be a fun read. And it definitely is.

Reichl is a good storyteller and her adventures going to restaurants in disguise are a hoot. She peppers the narrative with recipes and the texts of her published reviews. I especially enjoyed reading about the depth to which she inhabited each of her alter-egos. I laughed out loud at Chloe summoning a cab.

Great read. Snarfed it down in three days.

Warning: this book will give you the munchies.

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